Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Tcat » Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:05 pm

Speedlion wrote:
Crimson Knight wrote:I've seen both being acceptable; this has always confused me.

Nope... no additional comma needed... the latter sentence is grammatically right...

Mom and I argue about this all the time. She learned it without the comma, I learned it with. The rules LITERALLY change everyday about this sort of thing. The only time you don't use a comma is when you're doing "pork, beef, and macaroni and cheese". So long as it's separating a noun/verb/whatever just use a comma unless it's meant to be grouped as one item like "Mac & Cheese".. without the cheese you just have mac! If it's "John, James, Jodi, and Jack" use a comma just for safety sake.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Speedlion » Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:14 pm

I always see the "," as a replacement for "and" or "or"... if you go with that logic, then you'd say "and" two times... but then again, those are Dutch rules...
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Tcat » Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:27 pm

I'm pretty sure it might also be American vs Canadian English in this case. That's just how I learned it in high school (in the states). You have to take into account regional things too. It's like having to learn the difference between APL and APA style writing... English is silly and probably the most screwed up when it comes to rules.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby theJcfreak » Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:35 pm

Tcat wrote:I'm pretty sure it might also be American vs Canadian English in this case. That's just how I learned it in high school (in the states). You have to take into account regional things too. It's like having to learn the difference between APL and APA style writing... English is silly and probably the most screwed up when it comes to rules.


It's American vs. American. Seriously, just go with what your school teaches. Your high school says no extra comma? No extra comma. College says add comma? Add comma. I don't know if there's any 'final say' on the extra comma rule. Perhaps Lea knows of one...
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Kureejii Lea » Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:40 pm

theJcfreak wrote:
Tcat wrote:I'm pretty sure it might also be American vs Canadian English in this case. That's just how I learned it in high school (in the states). You have to take into account regional things too. It's like having to learn the difference between APL and APA style writing... English is silly and probably the most screwed up when it comes to rules.


It's American vs. American. Seriously, just go with what your school teaches. Your high school says no extra comma? No extra comma. College says add comma? Add comma. I don't know if there's any 'final say' on the extra comma rule. Perhaps Lea knows of one...


Nope, sorry. Personally I'd tend towards the "no extra comma" thing... most of the time. It seems that for every source claiming that it's definitely one way, you can find another insisting it's definitely the other way.

That's the English language for ya. It's a rebel. It plays by its own rules.

Except when it doesn't.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Rick » Fri Sep 30, 2011 6:27 pm

Ah, the dilemma of the Oxford Comma, I believe it's called!

I've always used it personally, but if as many sources suggest not using it as using it, the conclusion I can come to is that it really doesn't matter either way. It's a "po-tay-to/po-tah-to" type of thing and I'd just use it however it feels right, so long as you don't do what Tcat's example a couple posts above is and you stay consistent with it.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby TutiFrutti112 » Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:47 pm

I prefer using the extra comma. I feel incomplete without it. I use it in Spanish too even though I'm not supposed to.

Speedlion, I think I know what you mean by the use of colons and quotations. Colonel are ocassionaly used for quotes to emphasize their importance or when a person isn't directly saying the quote.

I remember what he last said to me: "Don't give up hope."

She told him the first truth she had spoken in a long time: "I love you."
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby KyleJCrb » Tue Oct 04, 2011 6:26 am

And you told me you were a bad writer, Lea. LIES! ALL LIES! *ahem*

Clearly this is a thread I need to read more closely. Soon.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby The Coolness » Wed Oct 05, 2011 10:14 am

Hey Lea, could you cover infinitives, participles and Gerunds on this thread?
Because that would be awesome.
Please?
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Kureejii Lea » Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:19 pm

Retrocoolness wrote:Hey Lea, could you cover infinitives, participles and Gerunds on this thread?
Because that would be awesome.
Please?


I wasn't planning on it, but I guess we can go over that a bit if you want. I'll keep it in mind when I'm putting together the next updates.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby The Coolness » Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:55 pm

Kureejii Lea wrote:
Retrocoolness wrote:Hey Lea, could you cover infinitives, participles and Gerunds on this thread?
Because that would be awesome.
Please?


I wasn't planning on it, but I guess we can go over that a bit if you want. I'll keep it in mind when I'm putting together the next updates.

Awesome!
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby The Shadow Emperor » Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:33 pm

Just a curiosity...are there grammatical cases in English for nouns, such as nominative, accusative, dative, ablative, genitive, et cetera? I know there are in Latin.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby Kureejii Lea » Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:45 pm

The Shadow Emperor wrote:Just a curiosity...are there grammatical cases in English for nouns, such as nominative, accusative, dative, ablative, genitive, et cetera? I know there are in Latin.


I may be wrong, but I think most of that applies to older forms of English rather than what we speak today.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby MegaHayzer » Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:49 am

Someone needs to explain the "who/whom" thing to me. Because I always butcher it. My shoddy English teacher didn't help either. Let's go over it! Ten minutes. Test. Wat.
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Re: Workshop: Writing (tips, techniques and references)

Postby TutiFrutti112 » Sun Oct 09, 2011 2:46 pm

I'm going to step in for a moment. In a nutshell, "who" is used as a subject or someone performing an action, while "whom" is an object, or receives the action.

Who broke the lamp?
To whom shall I send the bill for the broken lamp?

To check if you got it right, change the wording of the sentence and exchange "who" or "whom" for "(s)he" or "him/her" respectively.

He broke the lamp.
I shall send him the bill for the broken lamp.
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